Leah Jay | Newcastle - Civic Park
Leah Jay | Newcastle Art Gallery
Leah Jay | Newcastle Library
Leah Jay | The Hill showing Anzac Walk
Leah Jay | Newcastle - Civic Theatre
Leah Jay | Newcastle Court
Leah Jay | Newcastle Grammar School - Park Campus
Leah Jay | Newcastle - Civic Theatre & Digest Cafe
Leah Jay | Newcastle & The Hill aerial view to the ocean and Newcastle Harbour
Ornamental shank

Newcastle

2300

Newcastle/Lake Macquarie
  • Beach
  • Inner City
  • High School
  • Cafes / Shops
  • Cycleway
  • Shopping Centre
  • Parks
  • Dog Park
  • Public Swimming Pool
  • Library
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Investor Snapshot

  • Median Age 41
  • Number of Businesses 2,661
  • Pop density (Persons per KM SQ.) 2,294
  • Average Household Size 1.8 people
  • Rental Market 51.2%
  • Households that speak languages other than English 11%
  • Source - Figures relate to the 2016 Census (Code SSC12949) and the Australian Bureau of Statistics: Newcastle - Cooks Hill Statistical Area 2

A GUIDE TO HELP YOU IN YOUR SEARCH FOR A PLACE TO LIVE, OR INVEST, IN NEWCASTLE, LAKE MACQUARIE OR MAITLAND

Newcastle is the second biggest city in New South Wales. Situated at the mouth of the Hunter River, Newcastle is a thriving regional area.

Newcastle is bordered by Cooks Hill, Hamilton and Wickham. Across the river sit the suburbs of Carrington and Stockton. The Port of Newcastle is the largest bulk shipping port on the east coast of Australia and the world’s leading coal export port. However, despite nicknames over the years such as “Steel City” and “Coal Town”, Newcastle is shedding much of its previous blue collar image in favour of a vibrant arts and technology-focused future.

“Overlooking the ocean at the end of Newcastle Beach is King Edward Park. The park boasts rolling grassy plains that create a natural amphitheatre with an original Victorian rotunda in the centre.”

Originally occupied by the Awabakal and Worimi people, Newcastle was discovered by Europeans in 1797. It was known as a “hellhole” because many dangerous convicts were sent there to work in the mines. By 1823 Newcastle had become a typical Australian pioneer settlement and began to attract free settlers. In the 1920s the Newcastle arts scene started to blossom despite the heavy influence of mining and ship-building in the region. Now the suburb has a selection of historical structures, from the convict-built “Bogey Hole” ocean pool, to Fort Scratchley, which was built in 1882, to the stunning Christ Church Cathedral overlooking Newcastle and the 1930s art deco University House on King Street.

Why rent in Newcastle?

Since the revitalisation of the Hunter Street Mall, independent shops have flourished along the shopping strip. From homewares to recycled fashion, Hunter Street Mall provides an eclectic mix of stores. For socialising and dining, the harbourfront has plenty of options, with live music at Queens Wharf and a mix of sophisticated bars and restaurants at Honeysuckle. It if it’s a morning coffee fix you need, Newcastle has several award-winning local cafes.

Overlooking the ocean at the end of Newcastle Beach is King Edward Park. The park boasts rolling grassy plains that create a natural amphitheatre with an original Victorian rotunda in the centre. King Edward Park also has picnic tables and barbecues, making it a great spot to spend a summer’s afternoon. A sunken flower garden attracts wedding party photo shoots, while York Drive, which runs through the park, was until recently used as a car racing track for an annual hill climb event.

Suburb-Profile-Newcastle-6

Suburb-Profile-Newcastle-5

Newcastle is home to Australia’s oldest continually running school. Newcastle East Public School still provides classes for Kindergarten to Year 6 students in the historical buildings, which were built in 1878. Sitting at the top of “The Hill”, the school overlooks much of area. Newcastle Grammar School, which is a private primary and high school, also resides here, with an additional campus at Cooks Hill.

With a high population density, the city of Newcastle is home to many couples and smaller households, with families preferring to stick to the western suburbs. New apartment developments have attracted some older residents in recent years, although the average resident age is 34.

Many of Newcastle’s residential properties are units or apartments, mixed in among old terrace housing. Developments on the harbour and waterfront will see more apartment buildings being constructed, while the new University of Newcastle campus brings more students into the centre of the city.

Images: Copyright 2016/2018 Leah Jay.

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